Paradigm Theatre Company

Reviews!


 A Bad Case of the Mondays (2014)

★★★ Remotegoat review.

★★★Everything Theatre review.

★★★ Views from the Gods review.

What's On London review.

London Theatre 1 review.

Hackney Hive review.


Fresh Off the Boat! (2013)

★★★What's Peen Seen review.

★★★1/2 The Public Reviews review.

★★★ Views From the Gods review.

★★★ One Stop Arts review.

What's On London review.

Last Minute Theatre Tickets review.

The Londonist review.

Hackney Hive review.

Frost Magazine review.



Tartuffe (2013)

★★★★ Views From the Gods review.

★★★★ Grumpy Gay Critic review.

★★★ What's Peen Seen review.

Frost Magazine review.

Hackney Hive review.

Onomatopoeia review.


A Woman of No Importance... or Somewhat Little Importance Anyhow (2013)

★★★★ Views From the Gods review.

★★★★ What's Peen Seen review.

★★★ Everything Theatre review.

★★★ Remotegoat review.

★★★ Grumpy Gay Critic review.

★★1/2 The Public Reviews review.

The Stage review.

Last Minute Theatre Tickets review.

Onomatopoeia review.

Melissa June's London Culture review.


Freedom, Books, Flowers, and the Moon (2012)

★★★★★ Last Minute Theatre Tickets review.

★★★★★ Remotegoat review.

★★★1/2 The Public Reviews review.

★★★ Remotegoat review.

Hackney Hive review.

British Theatre Guide review.

The Londonist review.


The Inappropriateness of Love (2012)

★★★★ Remotegoat review.

The Stage review.

Frost Magazine review.

The Londonist review.

Suite101 review

(Website no longer in service)

http://suite101.com/article/the-inappropriateness-of-love-at-the-hen--chickens-a411700

London's only rep theatre company, Paradigm Theatre sets the standard for their upcoming season with 'The Inappropriateness of Love' at The Hen & Chickens!

Sep 10, 2012 Tom Ward-Thomas

Paradigm Theatre is the new and intriguing force to enter the London theatre scene. The only repertory theatre company in London, I was lucky enough to review their opening benefit show back in July, which was a combination of tantalizing little bites of their upcoming season. Now they’re back with their first full production, The Inappropriateness of Love, a new play written by Paradigm’s artistic director, Sarah E. Pitard. The question is, does this new play live up to the storming diversity and intelligent performances seen at their benefit show?

Jessica (Cheska Moon), a divorced psychotherapist with a five year old daughter, employs as her babysitter Zoey (Lee Lytle). Zoey is a fiery PhD student who is secretly in love with her friend Scooter (Jonathan West). Scooter is a socially inadequate client of Jessica’s, who he’s besotted by. He works in a cubicle next to frustrated receptionist Stephanie (Phoebe Batteson Brown). Stephanie is a tarty loud mouth who has been having an illicit affair with their much older boss Darren (Mark Arnold). Darren is Jessica’s philandering and hopelessly lost ex-husband who occasionally finds himself returning to his ex-wife for some bewildered sex. The central figure in this collection of troubled individuals is Scooter, who is trying to work out who to take as his date to a friend’s wedding whilst guiltily avoiding talking to his mother (Gilly Daniels) about his fathers ever worsening Alzheimer’s.

So here we have our outline, six interconnected characters, each feeling unreciprocated sentiments of love for one another, each of a completely different variety. It is complex and interwoven and explores a difficult volume of issues but Pitard constructs all the different revelations with an excellent fluency and certainly hits home on many of the concerns she targets. The one criticism on the script would be that there could be more of it. All the different variations of unreciprocated, inappropriate love are easily relatable for most of the audience and there was definitely scope for further exploration into how these feelings effect us. That said, what was explored was done so with excellent wit and insight and director Cat Robey manoeuvred the cast of actors through this complex maze of emotions with a beautiful subtlety.

Scooter forms the central link between the characters and Jonathan West gave a hilarious performance as possibly the most neurotic and troubled of all the lovelorn personalities, whilst never succumbing to the temptation to overdo it. Cheska Moon brought a brilliant diversity to Jessica’s dual role of calm and composed therapist and frazzled single mother and there were some fantastic comic moments in the play where the two characteristics merged. Other notable performances would have to go to Mark Arnold and Gilly Daniels, who provided some of the most poignant moments of the play.

So in short, The Inappropriateness of Love is a promising and exciting start to Paradigm Theatre’s upcoming season. It was funny and insightful with some outstanding acting and with further development I’d be looking forward to seeing it in the Royal Court.




Make a Free Website with Yola.